Posted on

CHAIR COVER Part 5: Gussetting

Putting the parts of a slipcover together seems very straightforward.  That is, if you want it loose. Loose is code for messy in my estimation.   I like mFOR POST...Pinch-90-out-of-seat-corner-1-ed-141x250y furniture covers TIGHT.   So, if you want your slipcover to fit like upholstery, they must fit well.

Attach the gusset to the cover using the same procedure as with the backrest…

  1. Pin fit the gusset onto the cover.
  2. Trace and mark the curve.
  3. Stitch the seam.
  4. Slip it on the chair to test the fit.

 

Drape your cover fabric over the chair again with wrong sides out.  Most important→ Match Centers and Edges.  Remember fabric must be smooth and taut – not tight.FOR POST...Pinch-90-out-of-seat-corner-1-ed-141x250

If you have not already done so, cut your Gusset.   Measure your short dimension on the crosswise grain so the long dimensions runs lengthwise.  My gusset needed to be 6″ wide.  aa Cut GUSSETS (side panesl) 6 inches long by fabric width

Just as when handling the curve on the backrest, trace the seat curve on paper to use as a reference when sewing.

cc ED Just like seat back curve...TRACE CURVE AT SEAT TOP [shown] AND SEAT FRONT ONTO PAPER. yOU CAN FEEL THESE WITH YOUR FINGER

Carefully measure and mark the seam allowance on the gusset.  Place your traced pattern edge on this seamline and draw in a stitching guide.d AFTER CUTTING OUT SEAT CORNER PATTERN, MATCH SEWING EDGE WITH SEAM ALLOWANCE MARK ON SIDE PIECE

Here is a close up of my pattern and the marked seam allowance – before I traced the seamline onto the gusset.dd DRAW ALONG THE PATTERN EDGE TO INDICATE SEAM LINE

With wrong sides out, match the traced  seamline on your gusset with the seat edge [not the fabric raw edge] and pin it to your chair to prevent movement.   The traced seamline is visible in the picture – that is, if you look very closely.  I have not yet pinned in the seam. Try-cover-on-chair-WRONG-side-out-to-check-fit-and-that-the-seam-line-of-the-unsewn-curve-falls-in-line-with-the-chair-corner-and-the-leg-corner.

There it is!!100 RIGHT SIDES TOGETHER, MATCH THE SHORT EDGE OF THE GUSSET TO THE EDGE MARK

Find the corner – or pivoting point  – on the cover.  I marked the seat edges with a yellow pencil and pinned the front portion down.  I removed the stabilizing pins reduce distraction and illustrate how  easy it is to make this determination.  Leave yours in except for the corner-most ones.    1 Pull draped cover to side at 90 3 best one ed

Pinch the corner tightly to get a snug fit.2 Pinch 90 out of seat corner ed

This is a closeup of the match point between the cover and gusset at the front corner of the seat.  Although it is not a sharp angle, taking care to keep these matched will lessen pulling after you cover is complete and someone sits on the chair.122 closeup corner pivot - CORNER MATCHES TRACED PATTERN HERE FIRST

Pin the gusset and cover together along the seamline using your  pins as if they were the final stitches.  This side seam only runs from the bottom front along the curved corner to end where the side of the chair stops.  Do not continue sewing around the back.  Note the yellow pin head visible at the end of the side seam indicated by the yellow arrow.300 front corner sewn ed

 ease curve 2Stitch this seam carefully easing in fullness of the cover at the curve.  At left, are the pinned together pieces lying flat on my table.  Below, I have pulled my fullness behind the presser foot, allowing me to stitch flat for a little while.  The longer side is down, facing the feed dogs.Insert sewing machine needle at imagined corner point, and

After stitching, trim excess seam allowances down to a manageable level.  I serged mine, but I live dangerously.  If you don’t mind doing the task more than once, reduce to about 3/4″ for your first fitting.

Turn your nearly complete cover right side out, and try it on your almost refurbished chair.   Check for fit. Pay special attention to the curves.  Make sure the seat pleat is firmly tucked in.  If it is not, the curves at seat front will appear too large for the chair.  If your seams pucker or have pleats, simply remove the stitching around the blemish, re-ease and re-stitch.

I veered off course on one side of my seat, and needed to redo that curve.  It was easy.  I just repeated the pin and sew step in that place.

Clip and grade seam allowances to diminish show through, if you have not already.

Next step>